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Black Duck Wild Rice—Powerful New Case Study

“…the answer needs to be more active. Reconciliation needs to be a process. Nishnaabe people have shared, to the point that they are doing without the basic necessities, such as healthy traditional foods and the means to access them within their own traditional territories. So there has to be a re-sharing, sharing right from the top to the bottom. This is the process of reconciliation.

In the latest case study in the Social and Informal Economies of Food series, Paula Anderson and James Whetung explore the transformation of Black Duck Wild Rice from a small, private, for-profit business to a multi-faceted, community-integrated social enterprise sharing seed, knowledge and an element of control through community seeding, harvesting and processing of natural food resources.

Manoomin means the good seed or sacred seed in Anishinaabemowin (Ojibway language). The Anishinaabeg have maintained a relationship with manoomin, caring for it, harvesting it, eating it, trading it, honoring it for generations upon generations. It is considered one of the central lifeways of the Anishinaabeg and in essence has defined who they are for millennia. Their intimate reciprocal relationship with this plant is affirmed in their ceremonies, songs and stories and integrated into their practices.

The case study takes you through the historical, geographic and social context of BDWR, and lays out all of the resources that have contributed to the development of this labour of love. Available to read online or download as a pdf

 

Levers for Food Systems Change: A Panel Discussion on Urban Food Security, Food Justice, and International Agreements

Tue, October 23, 2018
8:15 AM – 10:30 AM EDT

Balsillie School of International Affairs
67 Erb Street West
Room 142
Waterloo, ON

Over the last three years various international agreements have highlighted the need for greater coordination along the food chain and increased food justice in creating urban food security. These international agreements have set the stage for new urban food policy to emerge. At this panel discussion, food system experts from Wilfrid Laurier University, Carleton University, and the City of Toronto will explore how we can use the New Urban Agenda and other international agreements (SDGs and the Milan Urban Food Policy Pact) as levers for changing the food system.

A light breakfast will be served.

Registration is required.

Panel moderated by:
Dr. Alison Blay-Palmer, Director of the Centre for Sustainable Food Systems and Associate Professor in Geography and Environmental Studies at Wilfrid Laurier University

With panelists:
Dr. Patricia Ballamingie, Associate Professor Environmental Studies and Human Geography
Barbara Emanuel, Manager Toronto Food Strategy, Toronto Public Health
Dr. Theresa Schumilas, Postdoctoral Fellow, Geography and Environmental Science

Unable to attend in-person? We welcome you to watch the event via liverstream. Livestream details coming soon.

Presented by the Laurier Centre of Sustainable Food Systems

Workshop on Participatory Action Research, Planning and Evaluation

[…notice from Daniel Buckles of SAS2 Dialogue]

October 18-20 (Thursday-Saturday), 2018

Centre des practique creatives / Creative Practices Centre

Université d’Ottawa / University of Ottawa

451 Smyth Rd, Ottawa

The creation of knowledge “with” people and not “on” or “for” people is a critical challenge in today’s democracies. This applies to settings involving vulnerable or marginalized communities, the general public and the workplace where meaningful engagement is needed to identify priorities and develop policies, services, programmes and projects.

The three-day workshop is organized into modules that help you learn practical tools that can be adapted to design research projects that are action-oriented. We will also explore tools for participatory assessment of project impacts, and the use of digital tools. Learning is practiced in the context of participant projects and knowledge, making it possible to do real work while learning new skills.

REGISTRATION

The workshop is open to students enrolled in university or college (full and part-time), and to university and college faculty.

COST

Students: $350.00 plus HST

Faculty: $420 plus HST

Provides a total of 21 hours of instruction towards the SAS2 Dialogue certification program.

THE INSTRUCTOR

Dr. Daniel Buckles is an Adjunct Research Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada, and co-author with Jacques Chevalier of Participatory Action Research: Theory and Methods for Engaged Inquiry, published by Routledge (second edition in progress).

For more information and to register see: Workshop Description

Connecting with the Land: Wellness through the Boreal Forest

Our Social and Informal Economies of Food partner Willow Springs has an announcement that will have you booking tickets for Thunder Bay!

Willow Springs Creative Centre is thrilled to be hosting the upcoming Annual Conference of the Canadian Horticultural Therapy Association entitled

‘Connecting with the Land: Wellness through the Boreal Forest’

Please help us spread the word about this gathering of people who recognize the importance of people reconnecting with nature, using gardening and the land to help facilitate healing and wellbeing in everyone. Please consider attending the conference or supporting one of your staff members to attend!

Please post and share this brochure widely, with your colleagues and contacts.

CHTA Conference Brochure

If you have any questions or require additional information please do not hesitate to contact Judi Vinni, Coordinator, Willow Springs Creative Centre.

Hidden Harvest Ottawa has big dreams for a greener Ottawa. What are yours?

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Imagine if every time you purchased $100 worth of groceries, your grocery store donated $25—or 1/4 of their ‘harvest’—to their local food bank. This is the scale of charitable benefits that Hidden Harvest supports in Ottawa.
Hidden Harvest‘s impactful new video describes the benefits of gleaning to the uninitiated, and follows with a series of recommendations challenging municipal political leaders to make their community’s future “the most sustainable future it can be”. The video captures the essence of the Nourishing Communities Hidden Harvest Case Study by Chloé Poitevin DesRivières, released earlier this year. The case study found that, along with benefits to local food access agencies and processors,
the services Hidden Harvest offers to the community and the city by creating alternate means to feed people, manage renewable resources, developing green infrastructure and diverting waste from landfills, speak to the aims of different city offices, including community and social services, energy planning, and forestry services.

This new video makes the case that the exceptional value in the public services produced through largely voluntary labour deserves the support of public officials.

2018 Vote on Food and Farming

From Sustain Ontario

Vote ON Food & Farming 2018

Good food has the power to make positive change. Food and farming policies and programs can grow Ontario’s economy, reduce our health care costs, improve our environmental impact, build stronger communities, reduce poverty, and improve educational outcomes. These issues are vital to Ontarians, as recent IPSOS polling has demonstrated. With this in mind, Sustain Ontario has surveyed experts working in food and farming sectors to bring important policy issues to the forefront of the conversation.

We encourage you to visit the Vote ON Food and Farming website (http://sustainontario.com/vote-on-food) to access resources that equip both MPP candidates and the public with information about the importance of Ontario’s food systems. As part of the campaign, we have provided background information and evidence, as well as a question card for citizens to use during public debates. We also invite you to share your commitment to healthy food and farming by tweeting with the hashtag #voteONfood.

Yep, we do poetry: Faris Ahmed’s Fractured Food Systems Blues

Last year our research team released the book Nourishing Communities: From Fractured Food Systems to Transformative Pathways (Springer), which documents more than a decade of collaborative work by our network of scholars, community-based partners, and practitioners interested in constructing more sustainable and just food systems.

In November, Carleton University’s Faculty of Public Affairs hosted a discussion of the book at Irene’s Pub in Ottawa. Moe Garahan (Just Food Ottawa), Jay Garlough (Hidden Harvest Ottawa), and Faris Ahmed (USC Canada) commented on the book and discussed their own work in transforming food systems. One of the highlights of this engaging evening was Faris’ response to the book in the form of spoken word. It was so good, we went back to record it!

Below you will find Faris’ performance. You can also find the entire audio on YouTube.

Tommy Wall is an incoming graduate student in Carleton University’s Communication Studies program. He interviewed Faris, and produced and edited this piece.

New Case Study: Hidden Harvest Ottawa

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Hidden Harvest—the latest case study from The social economy of food: Informal, under-recognized contributions to community prosperity and resilience—tells the story of Ottawa’s fruit-and-nut gleaning initiative. Since 2012, Hidden Harvest has used food tree harvest events and outreach activities to enhance community food security and sovereignty, as well as local ecologies and economies.

Hidden Harvest is a for-profit social enterprise that aims to legitimize and support the practice of harvesting fruits and nuts in urban areas. The organization has developed a model through which to increase access to—and availability of—fresh, healthful foods hyper-locally in Ottawa, as people harvest from their own (or nearby) neighborhoods.

Read the full case study online or in pdf here:

http://nourishingontario.ca/the-social-economy-of-food/case-studies-subversions-from-the-informal-and-social-economy/hidden-harvest/

Cost-Share Local Food Box programs

The Ecology Action Centre has supported communities through subsidized local food box programs in rural Nova Scotia. The Cost-Share Local Food Box programs seek to address food insecurity while recognizing that accessibility would be a key factor in shaping the programs.

CSA Boxes

This report, by Tina Yeonju Oh, evaluates the approaches to the Cost-Share model that have been implemented in Cumberland County and Cape Breton. In addition, this report looks at other subsidized food box models in Atlantic Canada to compare differences, findings, and operational practices.

“We hope that results from this report demonstrate that ethical alternative food systems are possible and can be empowering, sustainable, and economically beneficial to local and rural communities.”

Download the full report here (pdf 1.6 MB).