The Food Hub Future

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The Future of Local Food for the Region

March 25, 2015

Day long “Scaling Up Wholesale” workshop organized by Eat Local Sudbury Co-op. Cap the day off with PRESENTING THE DESIGN: A REGIONAL FOOD HUB

The time has come to present the design for the NEW Regional Food Hub to be built by Eat Local Sudbury Co-op. Learn more about our region’s unique Food Hub model that incorporates local food aggregation and food education for consumers, producers and wholesale purchaser.

Presentation is FREE to attend.

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LOCAL FOOD MINGLE AND MASH

When: Wednesday, March 25, 2015
Where: The Motley Kitchen, 70 Younge Street, Sudbury, ON
Time: 5PM-7PM
Cost: $15.00, tickets can be purchased at Eat Local Sudbury (176 Larch St., Sudbury, ON).

Before the ‘Regional Food Hub Presentation’ join us at The Motley Kitchen for some local food and beverages. We want to meet and chat about how the community can participate in the future of local food for the region. After your dinner stay for the presentation of the NEW Regional Food Hub. See you soon!

*Free for ‘Scaling Up Wholesale Workshop’ attendees*

Fortnightly Feast

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2015 Ontario Farmland Forum

March 27th will mark the 11th year the Ontario Farmland Trust has hosted a Farmland Forum to discuss emerging farmland protection concerns. And, the 2015 Ontario Farmland Forum, Pursuing Diverse & Collaborative Approaches to Farmland Protection… is very topical and timely. We have a provincial government that is looking for new approaches and partnerships that strengthen the agricultural sector and the protection of our rich agricultural land resources. Read more

LAST CHANCE! New Farmer Survey/Sondage sur les nouveaux fermiers et les nouvelles fermières

If you are currently farming, want to be a farmer, or have recently exited farming, we need to hear from you! Please take a few minutes to complete this survey to support the next generation of farmers in Canada. SURVEY CLOSES MARCH 31, 2015.
The National New Farmer Coalition and the University of Manitoba have put together a survey to assess the needs of new farmers in Canada where it concerns policy and educational opportunities. The results from this survey will be used to develop a National New Farmer Policy Platform that we aim to share with all levels of government. It will also document the sources of new farmer learning and make suggestions on how to improve this training in Canada. Please forward this survey to everyone in your farming/foodie network (it is available in both French and English). Read more

Policy 101- Lessons from the community

Building on the success of last year’s Policy 101: Community Action Workshop, this year the Ecology Action Centre decided to take the workshop on the road. They were in Amherst, Cape Breton (near Baddeck), and in Halifax to talk policy with individuals keen on making their institutions, municipalities and the province as a whole more supportive of healthy lifestyles, local food, and a sustainable environment. Read more

Villes nourricières

Last January, Vivre en Ville, an urban planing NGO based in Québec, Canada, launched a new book about sustainable local food systems. Named “Villes nourricières”, the book calls for a better integration of food in the local government agenda and a better integration of public health, environment, land planning and food policies.
Five majors ingredients are combined to create proximity-based food systems: productive spaces, responsible businesses, better access to healthy food, increased local food demand and optimized lifecycle. The book highlights many strategies, actions and case studies to help communities build their own local food strategy. Lire la suite

From New York State:

It’s Time to Find Out If Buying Local Vegetables Actually Helps Farm Towns

It’s a universally acknowledged truth that urban farmers markets are good for rural economies. Just ask U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack. After announcing the availability of $96.8 million in grants to fund various local food projects on Monday, Vilsack said, “Increasing market opportunities for local food producers is a sound investment in America’s rural economies.” But is it? That’s the question a team of researchers at Cornell University, led by economics professor Todd Schmit, will be digging into over the next two years… Read more

Last Chance to have your say!

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Food Hub Survey Closing March 31

Thank you to all of you who have already participated in this important survey.  If you haven’t completed your survey (it is possible your link has expired) or wish to begin again please see the link below.  We are very eager to hear from as many people as possible.  This will be our last communication, the food hub survey will close at the end of the month!

For further details on the survey

For technical issues or questions about filling out the survey please reply to Mike Nagy nagym@uoguelph.ca or call 519-829-6249. For questions about this project, please contact Dr. Alison Blay-Palmer: ablaypalmer@wlu.ca.   Thank you!

Follow this link to the Survey:
New Directions Food Hub Survey

Or copy and paste the URL below into your internet browser:
https://uoguelph.eu.qualtrics.com/WRQualtricsSurveyEngine/?Q_SS=cMUN7oQpROmHztX_bP1JYQMeBNU8iDH&_=1

Ugly Fruit breakthrough

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… a Rabble.ca post from Wayne Roberts on food waste and accountability, blemishes and all…

‘Ugly fruit’ finally breaks through to supermarket shelves

March 18, 2015

There’s a lot to learn from Loblaws decision to sell less attractively shaped fruit and vegetables for 30 per cent less than their more stylish counterparts on the other side of the produce runway.

Loblaws is not only the leading supermarket in Canada. It’s also a retailing pioneer that draws on the marketing knowhow of a multi-billion dollar global empire of trend-setting products in parent company Weston’s stable of brands, retailers and processors  — one of which is French Intermarché, who successfully launched the whole trend of selling disfigured food a year ago.

Some of what’s revealed by the sale of what Loblaws now packages as “naturally imperfect” produce is a lot uglier than the bumpy potatoes, apples and carrots that have heretofore suffered exclusion from the food supply.

Read more

Steps to Sustainability

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Second Annual Halton Region Food Tourism Summit

Halton Region is committed to supporting and preserving our vibrant agricultural industry.

The objective of the second annual Halton Region Food Tourism Summit is to bring together Halton’s food community to learn about innovative industry initiatives and talk about putting more locally sourced foods on our tables. The day is designed to help make connections that will lead to fruitful partnerships going forward and increased local area food availability for all.

Thursday, March 26, 2015 9a.m.-4p.m.

Country Heritage Park, Gambrel Barn 8560 Tremaine Rd., Milton, On L9T 1X9

The event is free of charge.
For more details, and to register

Fortnightly Feast

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Better Farming story on the Regional Food Hub Survey

Food Survey News

Our Regional Food Hub Survey features in the latest (May 10, 2015) online Better Farming breaking news. Read the full story here

YMCA Cedar Glen Hiring Farm Manager

YMCA Cedar Glen Outdoor Centre is a year round operation, open 7 days a week, which delivers outdoor education programs to school groups, youth and adult retreats, a day camp and an overnight camp focused on leadership development during the summer months. The centre also operates a fruit and vegetable farm and Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) system.

Reporting to the Facility Manager, the Farm Team Leader is responsible for planning and carrying out the day to day operations of the fruit and vegetable farm and the Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) system with the key objective to maximize productivity while utilizing organic farming practices. The position aids in delivering the highest quality farm education programs to outdoor education and summer camp participants that align with the overall mission, vision and values of the YMCA. Read more

Now THAT’s a Greenhouse!

The Inuvik Community Greenhouse, home of the Community Garden Society of Inuvik, is the most northerly greenhouse in North America and the only Community Greenhouse of its kind in the world!

The Inuvik Community Greenhouse is located at the corner of Gwich’in Road and Breynat Street, behind the Igloo Church, and is open from May until October. Read more

Now THAT’s a Rooftop Garden! (YouTube video)

From The Times of India:

10,000-sq-metre roof top farm makes waves in China

BEIJING: This 10,000-square-metre farm in southwest China’s Chongqing Municipality may look ordinary at first glance. But this is an exceptional farm situated on top of a sprawling factory that manufactures doors. It is big enough that a tractor is needed to help with farming. The factory’s staff grow crops there, as well as raise poultry and livestock.

Factory official Lu Xiaoqing explained the company’s rationale for setting it up. “It would be a waste if we left the big rooftop unused. That’s why we created a farming project that involves our staff…”. Read more

1ère journée des innovations pour une alimentation durable (JIPAD 2015)

Jeudi 02 avril 2015 (10h00-16h30)
à Agropolis International
(Amphithéatre Louis Malassis)
1000, Av. Agropolis – Montpellier

Avec les étudiants ingénieurs de spécialisation “Innovations dans les systèmes agricoles et agro-alimentaires du monde” (ISAM) et de mastère spécialisé “Innovations et politiques pour une alimentation durable” (IPAD) – Montpellier SupAgro/CIRAD. Lire la suite

Alternative Eats

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Watch a discussion on The Agenda (TVO) about the new product Soylent, involving Irena Knezevic (of Nourishing Communities).

At what point does food become more than sustenance? Food experts gather to talk about the growth and implications of non-traditional foods like soylent and other supplements. Watch the video here

From feudal to neoliberal: a historical look at Quebec’s agriculture and food regimes

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Laurier Centre for Sustainable Food Systems

Brown bag lunch and learn

Speaker:   Dr. Manon Boulianne, Dept. of Anthropology, Université Laval

Date:         Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Time:        11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Where: P3027 – Peters Building, Wilfrid Laurier University
(School of Business and Economics, on the corner of University Ave and Albert St. in Waterloo)

From the 17th to the first half of the 20th century, petty commodity production was the modus operandi of an important part of Quebec’s family farms. During phases of industrial expansion, farm-born and raised young people flew to growing city centers. During economic depressions, new regions of colonization were opened in order to prevent French Canadians from leaving for New England, where they moved to find factory work. Commodification and specialization of farming developed after WW1, and by the middle of the 1960′s, modernization and standardization became the norm.

How do these changes relate to the transformation of the agri-food system, in the province and beyond? These questions will be addressed from a food regime perspective. Emphasis will be placed on how regional dynamics were influenced by the nation-states and corporate actors which have occupied a hegemonic position within different food regimes?

Why New York City and San Francisco are focused on local food manufacturing and distribution

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…from the Initiative for a Competitive Inner City:

Record amounts of snow have depleted Boston-area grocery shelves of many food items in recent weeks. Snow-clogged streets and loading docks have resulted in delayed or erratic deliveries, making it difficult for grocery stores to replenish their stocks. In light of these recent events and the fear of future natural disasters, some cities, such as Boston, are giving increased attention to food as part of their resilience planning. Food resilience is concerned with how a community’s food system would recover from a shock such as a natural disaster. A vulnerable or disrupted food processing and distribution industry directly impacts food resilience and inhibits a community’s ability to return to normal functions.

Read more

Seed Saving in Northern Ontario

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Workshop Series – Sault St. Marie & Sudbury

(La version française suivra)

The Bauta Family Initiative on Canadian Seed Security the Sault Ste. Marie Horticultural Society and FarmStart (with funding from FedNor and the Northern Ontario Heritage Fund Corporation) are pleased to bring Michelle Smith of Northwind Farm all the way from Cape Breton to Sault Ste. Marie to offer an in-depth seed production workshop series for farmers and gardeners. These workshops are offered in conjunction with Seedy Saturday in Sault Ste. Marie– come early to take part in the seed exchange, tradeshow, and other seedy activities!

Local food should come from local seed. But what are the challenges of producing high quality local seed in Northern Ontario? How can we overcome those challenges? Most seed-saving resources do not offer tips on how to grow seed in marginal climates or regions that experience shorter growing seasons. Learn how to push the limits of your region, from market gardener and seed-saver, Michelle Smith of Northwind Farm. Michelle has been growing vegetables and open-pollinated, heirloom seeds in the challenging climates of Cape Breton for 30 years. Check out this excellent series of workshops we have put together to save seed in Northern Ontario:

Sault St. Marie information, dates, descriptions & registration

Sudbury information, dates, descriptions & registration

*Veuillez noter que ces ateliers sont seulement offerts en anglais.*

L’Initiative de la famille Bauta sur la sécurité des semences au Canada, la Société d’horticulture de Sault Ste. Marie et FarmStart (avec l’aide financière de FedNor et de la Société de gestion du Fonds du patrimoine du Nord de l’Ontario) sont fiers d’accueillir nul autre que Michelle Smith de la ferme Northwind, qui se déplace du Cap-Breton jusqu’à Sault Ste. Marie pour offrir aux fermiers et fermières une série d’ateliers approfondis sur la production de semence. Ces ateliers sont offerts dans le cadre de la Fête des semences de Sault Ste Marie, samedi le 7 mars 2015 – arrivez tôt pour profiter de la table d’échange de semence, des expositions, et des autres activités spéciales de la journée!

Notre nourriture locale devrait provenir de semences locales. Par contre, au nord de l’Ontario, il y a plusieurs défis à relever afin de produire des semences viables. Comment pouvons-nous les surmonter? Les ressources qui nous sont présentement disponibles ne nous donnent malheureusement aucune directive en ce qui concerne la production de semences dans un climat marginal ou dans une région ayant une courte saison de croissance. Apprenez comment profiter pleinement de ce que peut offrir votre région avec l’aide de Michelle Smith, maraîchère chevronnée et experte en conservation de semences. Depuis plus de 30 ans, Michelle cultive une vaste gamme de semences patrimoniales à pollinisation libre dans les conditions climatiques rudes du Cap-Breton. Elle est donc fière de pouvoir vous partager ses connaissances dans ces prochains ateliers :

Sault St. Marie information, dates, descriptions & registration

Sudbury information, dates, descriptions & registration