FLEdGE Project Co-ordinator applications, closing date

Project Co-ordinator, FLEdGE

UPDATE: Those intending to apply to the ‘FLEdGE Project Co-ordinator’ position should send applications before 11:59 p.m., Sunday January 22, 2017!

Food: Locally Embedded, Globally Engaged (FLEdGE) is a research and knowledge sharing partnership. We are committed to fostering food systems that are socially just, ecologically regenerative, economically localized & that engage citizens.

FLEdGE seeks an engaged, experienced, adaptable project coordinator who is passionate about local sustainable food.

The Project Co-ordinator will provide leadership, oversight of the research projects and administrative support for the work undertaken through research grants of Principal Investigator (PI), Dr. Alison Blay-Palmer. The candidate will be expected to be familiar with the literature and independently work on tasks, including but not limited to: research project coordination and support across seven Canadian research nodes and three international Working Groups. The candidate will also be responsible for the preparation of manuscripts for submission to academic journals.

The successful applicant will support the PI and a team of Canadian and international researchers and practitioners. This role requires excellent interpersonal skills and the ability to work independently. This position is based at the Centre for Sustainable Food Systems at the Balsillie School for International Affairs.

Project Co-ordination

  • Co-ordinate and oversee the progress of multiple streams of research, collaborators and research deliverables including academic publications, reports and webinars;
  • Lead the planning of proposed research initiatives;
  • Manage the progress of ongoing research activities including setting up and managing the project tracking systems;
  • Co-ordinate logistics and assist with administrative duties related to planning large scale workshops;
  • Participate in visioning next steps for the on-going work.

Data Design & Analysis

  • Complete background research for academic publications and plain language reports.

Administrative Support

  • Assist with the financial planning and tracking for Project activities, managing monthly spending, and completing all Project expenses and reports;
  • Write, edit and revise annual reports and provide support for grant writing;
  • Co-ordinate and participate in regular meetings including taking and circulating minutes;
  • Manage social media including creating content for website/blog and twitter account;
  • Other related administrative duties as required.

This Position Reports to: Alison Blay-Palmer, Associate Professor, Geography and Environmental Studies

Qualifications required to perform this position include education, special accreditations, years and type of experience, skills and abilities.

  • Minimum Undergraduate Degree in a related field, Masters preferred; Minimum 2 years of demonstrated experience coordinating research grant functions including reporting and expenses;
  • Previous exposure to grant proposal writing;
  • Strong writing skills as evidenced by academic publications;
  • Managerial skills as evidenced by prior project management experience in industry and/or academia;
  • Strong organizational and time management skills;
  • Experience with budget management and budget creation;
  • Works well in a team environment and independently;
  • Passionate about local sustainable food;
  • Easily able to adapt to change and competing priorities.

This position will be a 1 year renewable contract for up to 3 years. Candidates should provide their cv, transcripts and a sample of their writing. Please submit applications to Alison Blay-Palmer via email: ablaypalmer at wlu dot ca

Project Co-ordinator, FLEdGE (Food: Locally Embedded Globally Engaged)

Food: Locally Embedded, Globally Engaged (FLEdGE) is a research and knowledge sharing partnership. We are committed to fostering food systems that are socially just, ecologically regenerative, economically localized & that engage citizens.

FLEdGE seeks an engaged, experienced, adaptable project coordinator who is passionate about local sustainable food.

The Project Co-ordinator will provide leadership, oversight of the research projects and administrative support for the work undertaken through research grants of Principal Investigator (PI), Dr. Alison Blay-Palmer. The candidate will be expected to be familiar with the literature and independently work on tasks, including but not limited to: research project coordination and support across seven Canadian research nodes and three international Working Groups. The candidate will also be responsible for the preparation of manuscripts for submission to academic journals.

The successful applicant will support the PI and a team of Canadian and international researchers and practitioners. This role requires excellent interpersonal skills and the ability to work independently. This position is based at the Centre for Sustainable Food Systems at the Balsillie School for International Affairs.

Project Co-ordination

  • Co-ordinate and oversee the progress of multiple streams of research, collaborators and research deliverables including academic publications, reports and webinars;
  • Lead the planning of proposed research initiatives;
  • Manage the progress of ongoing research activities including setting up and managing the project tracking systems;
  • Co-ordinate logistics and assist with administrative duties related to planning large scale workshops;
  • Participate in visioning next steps for the on-going work.

Data Design & Analysis

  • Complete background research for academic publications and plain language reports.

Administrative Support

  • Assist with the financial planning and tracking for Project activities, managing monthly spending, and completing all Project expenses and reports;
  • Write, edit and revise annual reports and provide support for grant writing;
  • Co-ordinate and participate in regular meetings including taking and circulating minutes;
  • Manage social media including creating content for website/blog and twitter account;
  • Other related administrative duties as required.

This Position Reports to: Alison Blay-Palmer, Associate Professor, Geography and Environmental Studies

Qualifications required to perform this position include education, special accreditations, years and type of experience, skills and abilities.

  • Minimum Undergraduate Degree in a related field, Masters preferred; Minimum 2 years of demonstrated experience coordinating research grant functions including reporting and expenses;
  • Previous exposure to grant proposal writing;
  • Strong writing skills as evidenced by academic publications;
  • Managerial skills as evidenced by prior project management experience in industry and/or academia;
  • Strong organizational and time management skills;
  • Experience with budget management and budget creation;
  • Works well in a team environment and independently;
  • Passionate about local sustainable food;
  • Easily able to adapt to change and competing priorities.

This position will be a 1 year renewable contract for up to 3 years. Candidates should provide their cv, transcripts and a sample of their writing. Please submit applications to Alison Blay-Palmer via email: ablaypalmer at wlu dot ca

Agriculture, Food and Human Values Society Student Research Paper Awards

Please encourage students to submit papers to this year’s AFHVS Student Research Paper Award competition. The Award details, dates and instructions can be downloaded here. The call is open for both graduate and undergraduate submissions. Please circulate widely!

AFHVS is dedicated to an open and free discussion of the values that shape and the structures that underlie current and alternative visions of food and agricultural systems. The Society is most interested in interdisciplinary research that critically examines the values, relationships, conflicts, and contradictions within contemporary agricultural and food systems and that addresses the impact of agricultural and food related institutions, policies, and practices on human populations, the environment, democratic governance, and social equity. Recent award winning student paper titles include:

  • “Cultivating citizenship, equity, and social inclusion? Putting civic agriculture into practice through urban farming”;
  • “Problems with the defetishization thesis: The case of a farmer’s market”;
  • “The rise of local organic food systems in the US: An analysis of farmers’ markets”;
  • “Building a real food system: The challenges and successes on the college campus.”

For more information, please visit the websites below.

Email Jill Clark, Assistant Professor, John Glenn College of Public Affairs, Ohio State University (clark dot 1099 at osu dot edu) with any questions.

Read more

New Data on Local Food Marketing Practices from the USDA

USDA news release indicates growing importance of food hubs to expansion of local / regional food systems

From the first-ever benchmarking survey on local food marketing practices, conducted by USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service:

“More than 167,000 U.S. farms locally produced and sold food through direct marketing practices, resulting in $8.7 billion in revenue in 2015, according to the results from the first Local Food Marketing Practices Survey released today by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS).”

Read more survey results

What’s the Best Way to Grow Ontario Organic?

…from OCO:

The Organic Council of Ontario (OCO) needs your input!

Ontario boasts over $1 billion in sales of organic foods and yet only 2% of all agriculture in the province is organic. Why is the organic sector in Ontario growing so slowly in relation to demand?  How can government and the industry help Ontario businesses capture this growth opportunity?

Help guide the future of organics in Ontario.  

Take OCO’s survey by January 28th for the chance to win prizes!

Read more

Huron Food Action Network Seeking Board Members Urgently

from Nathan Schwartz, HFAN

Huron Food Action Network requires four (4) more board members who are willing to commit to attending monthly board meetings, as well as working on projects. Without this, the existing board will be forced to dissolve HFAN [read more]…

2016 was a very productive year with two completed projects (2016 Food Report and the Food Hub Assessment), continued participation in a Huron County tourism initiative focusing on culinary tourism, and the development of several grant proposals. HFAN partnered and/or discussed future partnerships with Huron Business Development Corporation, Huron County, Huron Manufacturing Association, Huron County Chef’s League, Huron County Library, Huron County Museum/Gaol, The town of Goderich and many more. HFAN even organized a very successful and widely acclaimed festival that has improved tourism in Goderich’s ‘shoulder’ season and proved HFAN’s ability to become self-sustaining.

If you have an interest in serving on the board, are willing to commit to a monthly meeting as well as taking on at least one other project, contact Nathan Swartz, HFAN Chair at
huronfoodactionnetwork@gmail.com before December 30th, 2016.

DIG (Durham Integrated Growers for a Sustainable Community)

A new case study from our ongoing ‘Social Economy of Food‘ research highlights DIG (Durham Integrated Growers for a Sustainable Community). Compiled by Mary Anne Martin, DIG was collected through interviews with the president of DIG, the coordinator of one of its member projects and one organization that has benefitted from regular delivery of produce from a member garden. In addition, it draws on documents and observations from: DIG’s website, its member projects, its annual general meeting, an executive meeting and a meeting of the Durham Food Policy Council (of which DIG is a member). As a participatory action research initiative, this research involved a collaborative project with DIG and the Durham Food Policy Council that analysed municipal policy in Durham Region to assess its support for urban agriculture and food security. The findings from the policy research also informs this report. Read or download the report!

Make a Difference for Local Food in Ontario — the 2nd Annual Ontario Food Hub Survey!

Your 2015 food sales numbers still matter! Help us to gather the evidence of Ontario’s growing regional food markets.

Receiving data for the 2015 business year and growing season would be of tremendous benefit—assisting funders and policy makers to better understand the challenges that you face.

We need a snapshot of your 2015 regional food sector activities so that we can better provide the facts—about important growing regional food markets and hubs—to agri-food sector policy-makers and funders.

The Nourishing Communities research group is conducting the second annual OMAFRA-funded survey to identify existing and potential regional food hub demand in Ontario. We need your input so we can provide the most up-to-date summary of food hub activity in Ontario for the 2015 growing season.

The goal is to enable you to get more local and/or sustainable food into the hands of consumers, apply for loans/grants, and give you a snapshot of your local food system. The survey results will also help funders understand more about community and business needs, where funding/resource gaps exist and how to effectively support operations such as yours.

We will be grouping the survey responses by regions to get a better picture of existing food systems and where there are more opportunities.

Thanks to everyone who participated in the first survey of food hubs in 2014 – we are happy to share results.

Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference 2016

November 22-23, Belleville ON

http://www.eastontlocalfood.com/eastern-ontario-local-food-conference-2016/

The Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference is just around the corner and this year’s focus is all about resilience in the face of climate change and other contemporary challenges.  Join us, and best-selling local food author and CBC columnist Sarah Elton, as we explore ways that Eastern Ontario local food and its producers, processors and influencers can meet those challenges and seize opportunities that are unique to Eastern Ontario local food.

This year’s conference includes:

  • Local Food Bus Tour:  An afternoon tour will highlight businesses in the Quinte region who are putting local food on the map.  Visit Sprague Foods, Barn Owl Malt, Wild Card Brewery, Enright Cattle Company, Potter Settlement Winery and Donnandale Farms.
  • Local Food Extravaganza (Tasting Event):  This showcase of local foods and beverages, representing the various culinary regions across Eastern Ontario, will tempt your taste buds into the conference’s first evening.
  • Keynote Speaker:  Drawing on her years of research and writing on food systems, award-winning journalist and best-selling author Sarah Elton will illustrate how Eastern Ontario’s local food system can be a part of the solution to serious global challenges. With inspiring examples from around the world, she will explore the idea of food system resilience – what it means, and how it can be applied locally.
  • Ignite:  Five minutes of back-to-back wisdom and inspiration from ten local food trailblazers.
  • Eastern Ontario Local Food 2050:  What does current scientific understanding predict when it comes to growing conditions in Eastern Ontario in the coming years? How can our agriculture sector prepare to meet challenges and access opportunities that might arise from these changes?
  • Economic Resilience for Local Food: How does a local food system create economic value both for its consumers and its producers? How does a shifting global trade environment affect our local food systems? Join this presentation and discussion with OMAFRA’s senior economist.
  • Global Realities, Local Decisions: Farming, food and beverage businesses can play a role in increasing our local food system’s resilience in response to global challenges. Hear from businesses about how these concerns have affected their local decision making.
  • Food Hubs:  “To Hub or Not to Hub” that is the question.  Explore what is happening with food hubs in Eastern Ontario and what it takes to plan a food hub that meets your community’s needs.
  • Designing Resilient Food Systems:  Hear from innovative farmers who are using infrastructure to improve the long-term resilience of their diverse operations.
  • The Municipal Role in Local Food: Local Food represents an economic development opportunity that municipalities may want to support. But where to start? Hear from jurisdictions that have developed good local food programs in keeping with the municipal role. Learn about resources that exist to guide your efforts and help evaluate your programs.
  • Business Decisions for Resilience: How can businesses plan and structure for economic resilience? How can that resilience benefit their communities? This session will provide examples of leadership in that field.
  • Marketing Local, Selling Local: Discover how one local campaign increases awareness of locally produced products & learn tips for getting your products into retail.
  • Costing & Pricing for Profit: Learn how to calculate your costs and price your products for financial success in retail and wholesale markets.

To register or for further details:

http://www.eastontlocalfood.com/eastern-ontario-local-food-conference-2016/

Considerations for Seed Security and Biodiversity Conservation in Newfoundland

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This research explores and assesses various perspectives on seed security issues in Newfoundland and is meant to inform the creation of an action plan for seed security work in Newfoundland in coming years. Drawing on ten interviews with individuals actively involved with seed saving and conservation, the report describes recent seed security efforts on the island and the current needs and assets. The unique conditions on the island include short growing seasons to harsh climatic conditions in the winter months, making the availability of locally adapted seed crucially important. Public interest in seed security is on the rise but local resources and funding to support seed activities is limited. The demand for locally sourced seed is significant but there are still few seed-savers. There is good seed access on the island and seeds are generally available at the quality and quantity farmers want and need, however, many seed varieties are considered to be very expensive. There is significant concern for endangered local varieties and erosion of genetic diversity, in particular with respect to Newfoundland heritage potato seed. The study could not conclusively determine the feasibility of developing a seed bank in Newfoundland.

This research was made possible by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council through the Food: Locally Embedded, Globally Engaged partnership and the support from the Atlantic Canadian Organic Regional Network, The Bauta Family Initiative on Canadian Seed Security and Echo Foundation. The findings presented here do not necessarily reflect those of the Atlantic Canadian Organic Regional Network, The Bauta Family Initiative on Canadian Seed Security, or Echo Foundation.

Please see below the full report:

considerations-for-seed-security-and-biodiversity-conversation-in-newfoundland