Recorded webinar presentations now available online

Subversions from the Informal and Social Economy:

Relocating social and ecological values in food systems

The Nourishing Communities research group is conducting community-based research investigating food initiatives that operate within the social or informal economy, intended to address food security and community development; benefit marginalized communities, including low-income groups, Aboriginal people, youth and women; and provide important environmental stewardship services. We presented initial reflections and case studies from regions across Canada in three 90-minute webinars, available as recorded webinar presentations now through these links:

March 1, 2017 – Eastern Ontario [recorded webinar]

March 14, 2017 – Northwestern Ontario [recorded webinar]

March 15, 2017 – Atlantic Canada and the Northwest Territories [recorded webinar]

 

 

 

 

The Social Economy of Food and the Ontario Food and Nutrition Strategy

The webinar Strengthening Ontario’s Food System: A Collaborative Approach (March 9, 2017) is now available online (YouTube). The webinar summarizes the Ontario Food and Nutrition Strategy (OFNS), and presents the rationale and evidence for 25 priority policy options within three strategic directions: healthy food access, food literacy and skills, and healthy food systems. The webinar also provides a snapshot of programs and policies currently underway that support the OFNS, including a summary of the case studies from the Nourishing Communities research into Social and Informal Economies of Food.

 

Advancing the Water-Food Nexus

TIAS-USF Webinar

Tues. Nov. 25, 2014
10-11:45 a.m. EST
16.00 – 17.45 CEST (GMT+1h)

Hosted by The Integrated Assessment Society 
and the Institute of Environmental Systems Research

The Water-Energy-Food Nexus is a relatively new approach for promoting security in all three sectors by reducing trade-offs, building synergies and improving governance across these sectors, and thus stimulating the transition to a green economy. The “nexus” is an important theme for The Integrated Assessment Society and the Institute of Environmental Systems Research since sectoral and disciplinary integration lie at the core of their mission. In order to launch the Nexus as a theme for TIAS, this webinar narrows the focus to water and food security, since the intersection of these two sectors alone is sufficiently broad and complex. It is intended for those practitioners, decision-makers and scientists whose work focuses on water security or food systems, and thus inevitably requires deeper consideration and understanding of both sectors.

The webinar will address the following questions:

  • Where are we at with the Nexus approach and what are some of the key challenges we face? What areas require strengthening and improved guidance?
  • What are some of the more promising Nexus assessment methods and tools used?
  • What kind of networking and research opportunities can we identify that will help knowledge exchange and development?

More details and webinar programme

Project SOIL Webinar

Shared Opportunities on Institutional Lands: Challenges and opportunities of on-site food production

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 3:00 – 4:30 p.m. EDT

In Ontario, several institutions are already producing food on their properties as a way to generate revenue; supply nutritious fresh food for consumption (by staff, patients, students, etc.); provide skills training and therapeutic benefits; and build social enterprises.

Project SOIL is a three-year feasibility study that explores the potential of on-site food production at public health care and educational institutions in Ontario.  This webinar will share how project partners at health care, social service and educational institutions went about getting gardens off the ground at their institutions, as well as some of the lessons we learned in the first year of working with pilot projects across the province.

Webinar participants will include:

  • Chef Christopher Jess, high school culinary arts instructor in Fergus Ontario, and the guiding force behind the Food School Farm (Centre Wellington District High School);
  • Doug Dowhos, Supervisor of Employment Options for St. Joseph’s Care Group and creator of the GreenWerks Garden social enterprise (Lakehead Psychiatric Hospital);
  • Tami Proctor, Registered Horticultural Therapist  leading the Victorian Garden project at Homewood Health Centre;
  • Louise Quenneville, Emergency Preparedness Coordinator and Project Manager at Hôpital Glengarry Memorial Hospital; and
  • Jenny Weickert, Our Farm coordinator at KW Habilitation.

 

For more information and to register, please contact Irena Knezevic at irena.knezevic@carleton.ca

A Place for Food in Public Spaces

Wisdom from community builders

Upcoming webinar: Thursday, July 3, 2014 12-1 p.m. EDT

To learn more and register, visit www.cfccanada.ca/webinars

Join Community Food Centres Canada for a free webinar that will explore different ways community-builders are using food programs like community gardens, markets, public suppers, and bake ovens to animate local parks. We’ll highlight how the principles of placemaking can transform public spaces by highlighting local assets and serving common needs.
On the panel are Jutta Mason, who for over 20 years has led the transformation of Dufferin Grove Park to a vibrant, community-supported park, and Sabina Ali, who alongside a Women’s Committee in her culturally diverse neighbourhood of Thorncliffe Park, started a plein air South Asian bazaar and community Tandoor oven. Moderator Liz Curran, the Manager of the Regent Park Community Food Centre at CRC, is developing a suite of food programs to animate the newly re-developed Regent Park neighbourhood, including gardens, a greenhouse, and bake ovens.
We hope you can join us! Feel free to Share it on Facebook, forward via email, or Tweet about it (we’re @aplaceforfood and you can use the #placemaking tag)

When: Thursday, July 3, 2014 from 12 to 1 p.m. EDT

Where: Your Computer

How Much: Free!

To LEARN MORE and REGISTER, visit www.cfccanada.ca/webinars

In the meantime, if you’re interested in whetting your appetite leading up to the webinar, we recently wrote a piece about how Regent Park Community Food Centre is undertaking placemaking in a nearby public park; and if you’d like to learn more about how community gardening programs work in the context of a Community Food Centre, have a look at our info-packed module on the topic.

As with all our webinars, this one will be posted to The Pod Knowledge Exchange along with a host of downloadable resources a week or so after the event. Become a member of The Pod to stay in the loop about this webinar and others yet to come.

The Community, the University, Sustainable Community Food Systems

Working Together to Improve Regional Food Systems

Interested in learning about Community-University partnerships and their ability to facilitate healthy, sustainable community food systems?

Join us for a webinar, Wednesday June 26, 1 – 2 pm EDT

Sign up to receive call-in information.

Hosted by The Community First: Impacts of Community Engagement (CFICE) project of Food Secure Canada and Carleton University

All webinars are recorded and posted within a week.

Webinar description

In 2000, the Waterloo Region was recognized nationally and internationally for its innovative and comprehensive approach to creating a healthy community food system. It was through this approach that food was recognized as a key determinant of health. In this webinar, Katherine Pigott, Steffanie Scott, and Wajma Qaderi-Attayi describe two models of community-university partnerships in the Waterloo Region Food System.

These models are operating through the Faculty of Environment at the University of Waterloo and through the Healthy Eating and Active Communities Team at the Region of Waterloo Public Health. We will compare and describe these two ad hoc models of community-university partnerships, both of which act as facilitators of a healthy community food system.

Our presenters:

Katherine Pigott has worked at Region of Waterloo Public Health since March 2000. Katherine has over twenty years experience in community based planning, systems change and policy formulation that spans health promotion, economic development, crime prevention, and environmental planning.  In the course of her work, she has launched several businesses and non-profit ventures to meet social needs. She acts as Chair of Health Promotion Ontario.

Steffanie Scott is Associate Professor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Management at the University of Waterloo, and is engaged in research on sustainable food systems in China and Canada. She is President of the Canadian Association for Food Studies and is past Co-chair of the Waterloo Region Food System Roundtable. Steffanie’s next research project will involve developing a sustainable urban food system assessment framework, which will be applied in several cities in China. Steffanie teaches a 4th year course on food systems and sustainability.

Wajma Qaderi-Attayi is now working to complete her Master’s in Public Health. Currently, as a Public Health Planner Intern, she is working on the Healthy Eating Active Communities team at the Region of Waterloo Public Health, also with Health Promotion Ontario. In addition, Wajma is also currently precepting public health surveillance at the University of Waterloo.

Upcoming Local Food Webinars

Social Enterprises and the New Wave of Food and Farming Co-operatives
Hannah Renglich, Glenn Valliere, and Randy Whitteker
When: Wednesday, Feb 13th, 2012
Time: Noon – 1:30 pm
View the webcast here (Adobe Connect – Social Economy Centre, U of T)

 

Is Community Supported Agriculture for you?
Tarrah Young, Green Being Farm
Live! Monday, January 28 @ Noon EST
Click here to register. (AgWebinar)

 

… and one recent webinar is now available online:
Production Planning to Increase Market Efficiency:
Reducing Financial Risk Through Food Hubs – an NGFN webinar