Tag Archives: local food

The Food Hub Future

The Future of Local Food for the Region

March 25, 2015

Day long “Scaling Up Wholesale” workshop organized by Eat Local Sudbury Co-op. Cap the day off with PRESENTING THE DESIGN: A REGIONAL FOOD HUB

The time has come to present the design for the NEW Regional Food Hub to be built by Eat Local Sudbury Co-op. Learn more about our region’s unique Food Hub model that incorporates local food aggregation and food education for consumers, producers and wholesale purchaser.

Presentation is FREE to attend.

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LOCAL FOOD MINGLE AND MASH

When: Wednesday, March 25, 2015
Where: The Motley Kitchen, 70 Younge Street, Sudbury, ON
Time: 5PM-7PM
Cost: $15.00, tickets can be purchased at Eat Local Sudbury (176 Larch St., Sudbury, ON).

Before the ‘Regional Food Hub Presentation’ join us at The Motley Kitchen for some local food and beverages. We want to meet and chat about how the community can participate in the future of local food for the region. After your dinner stay for the presentation of the NEW Regional Food Hub. See you soon!

*Free for ‘Scaling Up Wholesale Workshop’ attendees*

Steps to Sustainability

Second Annual Halton Region Food Tourism Summit

Halton Region is committed to supporting and preserving our vibrant agricultural industry.

The objective of the second annual Halton Region Food Tourism Summit is to bring together Halton’s food community to learn about innovative industry initiatives and talk about putting more locally sourced foods on our tables. The day is designed to help make connections that will lead to fruitful partnerships going forward and increased local area food availability for all.

Thursday, March 26, 2015 9a.m.-4p.m.

Country Heritage Park, Gambrel Barn 8560 Tremaine Rd., Milton, On L9T 1X9

The event is free of charge.
For more details, and to register

Why New York City and San Francisco are focused on local food manufacturing and distribution

…from the Initiative for a Competitive Inner City:

Record amounts of snow have depleted Boston-area grocery shelves of many food items in recent weeks. Snow-clogged streets and loading docks have resulted in delayed or erratic deliveries, making it difficult for grocery stores to replenish their stocks. In light of these recent events and the fear of future natural disasters, some cities, such as Boston, are giving increased attention to food as part of their resilience planning. Food resilience is concerned with how a community’s food system would recover from a shock such as a natural disaster. A vulnerable or disrupted food processing and distribution industry directly impacts food resilience and inhibits a community’s ability to return to normal functions.

Read more

Trends in U.S. Local and Regional Food Systems

The latest (2012) USDA numbers show that almost 8% of all US farmers are selling ‘local food’, with 70% of those selling direct-to-consumer (DTC). ERS census data analysis shows that 85% of these ‘local food farms’ have gross sales below $75,000 (US). The number of farms joining these ranks is slowing, as are the direct sales, which totalled an estimated $6.1 billion in 2012. However, farms with DTC sales are more likely to stay in operation than all farms not using DTC sales.

One cloud on the horizon: new ‘Produce safety’ and ‘Preventive controls’ rules under the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) may disproportionately affect these ‘local food’ farms. “DTC farms apply more manure than all non-DTC farms and thus could be disproportionately affected by any FSMA regulations on the application of biological soil amendments”. Read more

Fortnightly Feast

Pan Cape Breton Local Food Hub

(Capre Breton Post) — A small group of food producers came together Wednesday to discuss how they could organize to get more of their locally grown produce, livestock and seafood on the dinner plates of Cape Bretoners. The gathering at the Cape Breton County Farmers’ Exhibition in North Sydney was the third of five meetings hosted by the Pan Cape Breton Local Food Hub, an initiative funded by the Department of Agriculture and administered by Inverness County. Read more

Vidéos: Diversité des systèmes alimentaires et changements globaux

Dans le cadre du Mastère « Innovations et politiques pour une alimentation durable » (IPAD) de Montpellier SupAgro et du Cirad, nous avons organisé un séminaire de formation ouvert à tous et accessible en streaming. Avec notamment :

Nicolas BRICAS, Cirad : “Alimentation durable : quels enjeux pour la recherche ?”
Pierre-Henri GOUYON, Muséum national d’histoire naturelle : “La diversité des plantes cultivées”
Sébastien TREYER, Institut du développement durable et des relations internationales : “L’agriculture face à l’épuisement des ressources”.
Benoît DAVIRON, Cirad : “Les enjeux des marchés internationaux de produits agricoles”.
Gilles TRYSTRAM, AgroParisTech : “Quelles innovations en technologies alimentaires ?”
Olivier DE SCHUTTER, Université de Louvain, ancien Rapporteur spécial des Nations unies pour le droit à l’alimentation de 2008 à 2014 : “Bilan et perspectives de six années de mandat aux Nations unies”.

Lire la suite

Global Sustainability and Local Foods: Call for contributions

Deadlines: Papers: 15 February 2015   |   Videos and Posters: 30 May 2015

The complexity of industrial food production, processing and distribution and the growing distance between producers and consumers are at the center of heightened attention in academia and in social movements across the globe, with the latter in particular reclaiming democratic space on how food is grown processed and commercialized. The industrial production and distribution system by transnational and national corporations has been qualified by various scholars as deterritorialized, placeless and generating foods that are standardized and homogenized. Read more

Principles of agroecology can get us out of the food crisis in simple steps

I believe the solution is a combination of modern technologies and organic systems with greater attention to agroecology and income generation from new cash crops. But we need to recognize that the biophysical and socio-economic issues are different in temperate and tropical environments. Read more

Barbarians at the farm gate

Farm gates have traditionally been closed to capital markets: nine in ten farms are held by families. But demography is forcing a shift: the average age of farmers in Europe, America and New Zealand is now in the late fifties. They often have no successor, because offspring do not want to farm or cannot afford to buy out family members. In addition, adopting new technologies and farming at ever-greater scale require the sort of capital few farmers have, even after years of bumper crop prices. Institutional investors such as pension funds see farmland as fertile ground to plough, either doing their own deals or farming them out to specialist funds. Read more

Fortnightly Feast

Farmland Forever Campaign

To celebrate their 10th Anniversary, the Ontario Farmland Trust has launched a $1 million Farmland Forever fundraising campaign. With this campaign, they will be able to nearly double the amount of farmland under agricultural protection easements. Currently more than 20 farm owners are waiting to donate easements. The Farmland Forever campaign will also give OFT more capacity to support farmland policy development and expand research and education for improved farmland protection across Ontario.
** And from now until December 31st, every donation will be matched dollar for dollar by the Metcalf Foundation!! **
In this season of giving, why not save some land for a future farmer?

Conference on Sustainable Food Choices Livestreamed

LiveWell for low-impact food (LIFE) is a project which aims to contribute to the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from the EU food supply chain and demonstrate what healthy, sustainable diets could look like for different European countries.
Over the last three years, LiveWell for LIFE has worked with members of the multi-sectoral Network of European Food Stakeholders – which represent key stakeholders from across the EU – to reduce the impact food consumption has on the environment.
‘On our plate today: healthy, sustainable food choices’ is LiveWell’s concluding conference. Here they’ll look at the need for a global food strategy, and the role policymakers and business leaders alike play in encouraging sustainable food consumption.
To learn more about the project, please visit livewellforlife.eu
Watch the entire conference live online.

The Fourth Annual Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference

What is local? Some describe anything within a 50 or 100-kilometre radius as local; others include anything grown in Ontario or made in Canada as local. What was clear at the conference was that foodies want what they want, and business owners can’t afford to ignore them. Buying local is not a trend that is going to disappear.
Be unique. Grow your business as big as you want. Food hubs and sharing ideas and distribution processes are great ways to leverage your growth—as the master of your own destiny you can still remain niche while becoming mainstream. Read more

Taking Stock of the Mobile Good Food Market

“Basically the jury’s still out on how to operationalize it and make it sustainable, even for a nonprofit that’s subsidized,” says Debbie Field, executive director for FoodShare Toronto, the organization that runs the Mobile Good Food Market. “I don’t think that it’s actually working for anybody who’s doing it right now.”
The biggest value of mobile markets, she says, might be in demonstrating that there is a demand for healthy food in even the poorest neighborhoods. “It’s not that low-income people aren’t interested,” Field says. “They will buy the food if we can get it there. What FoodShare is proving is that people will buy this food and what we have to do is figure out logistically how to get it into communities.” Read more

Healthy food out of reach for many

If you suspect it cost more over the past year to buy groceries and cook even basic healthy meals at home, you’re right, according to new study. The 2014 Food Cost Survey released by the Brant County Health Unit reveals that the cost of eating healthy food for a family of four is now $193.85 a week in Brantford and Brant – or $839.37 out of the monthly budget. That’s an 8% increase over last year’s figure of $179.50 per week, or $777.19 a month. “The reality is that many families in our community can’t afford basic healthy food after paying for housing and other living expenses.” Read more

La Montañita Co-op: Fresh, Fair, Local and Organic!

La Montañita, a consumer cooperative, believes in the shared benefits of healthy food, sound environmental practices and a strong local economy with results that justify the resources used.
The Co-op is a leader in the local foods movement! We support local farmers through the Food-Shed Project. This initiative helps local farmers and producers get their products into more markets. Over 1,100 local products from 400 local producers make it to small community grocers, restaurants, and commercial kitchens as a result of the Co-op Distribution Center.
We know local, but we call it community. We serve our membership, but we also collaborate with farmers, local food and environment advocates, and educators to build community awareness about the links between food, health and the environment. Read more

Agriculture 3.0: a New Paradigm for Agriculture

October 29, 2014 (from farmviability.wordpress.com)

Study Topic: As a 2013 Nuffield Scholar, Gayl is seeking to redefine what it really means to be sustainable in food and farming, by asking: ‘If Agriculture 1.0 is subsistence farming that uses traditional farming practices, and Agriculture 2.0 is industrial agriculture, which is creating serious health and environmental concerns in Canadian communities and communities world-wide, then what might Agriculture 3.0 look like, that offers farmers more choice and also addresses the many concerns about feeding 9 billion by 2050?

Findings:
•    Farm direct marketing is active and very much a part of a way of life for Europeans. Local food just is and does not need to be labelled, because it always has been the way of food in these countries, without having to think about it.
•    Despite poverty and employment issues, young farmers in Transylvania believe they are in the best place in the world “should something ever happen” to the global supply system. They also believe in preserving their landscape, one of the most biodiverse regions in Europe.

•    For agriculture to contribute to a healthy world, we need to go back to the basics, with a mission statement of nourishing communities, not feeding the world.

Read more

‘Access to healthy food is a right, not a privilege’

(from the Citizen Record)

AMHERST – Making healthy, nutritious, locally grown food available to people who can’t afford it has proved to be a positive experience. “This is the first year we got the food box program off the ground,” said Su Morin, the Ecology Action Centre’s community food coordinator. “We had just over 30 people signed up this year and we’re hoping to increase that a little bit next year.”

Morin was helping serve people during the Local Food Luncheon Saturday at the Cumberland YMCA. The luncheon was a fundraiser for the Cumberland County Cost-Share, Community Supported Agriculture, Food Box program, a pilot project started in May, which aims to connect low-income families with healthy, affordable, locally produced food. Read more

Manger Local Québec

Portail de l’alimentation de proximité dans la Communauté métropolitaine de Québec

Québec, le 10 octobre 2014

Une équipe de chercheurs de l’Université Laval lance aujourd’hui le portail www.mangerlocalquebec.info. Celui-ci permet de repérer facilement les lieux d’approvisionnement où l’on peut se procurer ou produire soi-même des aliments de proximité, sur le territoire de la Communauté métropolitaine de Québec.

Marchés publics et virtuels, points de chute de paniers bio, fermes qui proposent des produits en vente directe aux consommateurs, jardins communautaires ou collectifs et commerces de proximité offrant des aliments en circuit court y sont répertoriés. Le site est accessible à partir d’un ordinateur, d’une tablette ou d’un téléphone mobile. Il abrite une carte interactive et un outil permettant d’effectuer une recherche par ville ou quartier.

Ce portail est issu du projet de recherche Manger « local » dans la Communauté métropolitaine de Québec: relocalisation des systèmes alimentaires et ville durable, dirigé par la professeure Manon Boulianne, du département d’anthropologie de l’Université Laval. Le projet a reçu l’appui de plusieurs partenaires.

Talkin’ Local Food with University Health Network

The University Health Network in Toronto received funding from the Greenbelt Fund to investigate short and long-term opportunities to provide more local food for in-patients in their hospital network. From interviews and an advisory panel, they have identified 3 long term challenges that they would like to submit to the community for input. They have launched an idea crowdsourcing platform where you can vote on the existing ideas, or add your own ideas for review.

Do you eat food? Then you have an opinion! Join in and unleash your ideas to better connect local Ontario food to the hospitals at University Health Network. Read more