DIG (Durham Integrated Growers for a Sustainable Community)

A new case study from our ongoing ‘Social Economy of Food‘ research highlights DIG (Durham Integrated Growers for a Sustainable Community). Compiled by Mary Anne Martin, DIG was collected through interviews with the president of DIG, the coordinator of one of its member projects and one organization that has benefitted from regular delivery of produce from a member garden. In addition, it draws on documents and observations from: DIG’s website, its member projects, its annual general meeting, an executive meeting and a meeting of the Durham Food Policy Council (of which DIG is a member). As a participatory action research initiative, this research involved a collaborative project with DIG and the Durham Food Policy Council that analysed municipal policy in Durham Region to assess its support for urban agriculture and food security. The findings from the policy research also informs this report. Read or download the report!

Social Innovation, Social Entrepreneurship, and Social Justice

WLU Office of Research Services

Social innovation and social entrepreneurship are hot topics nationally, internationally, and right here at home, at Laurier. But what do these terms really mean? There seem to be multiple definitions, depending on who it is you ask. As we increasingly embrace these concepts and approaches, we should be asking critical questions about for what and whom are we are innovating – and why. How are questions of power, inequality, social justice and human rights being addressed? Is social innovation a strategy for a better world? Or is it merely neoliberal agenda in disguise?

This year’s speakers will present alternative understandings of social innovation and social entrepreneurship, and offer critical perspectives in response to the question: “What are the connections and tensions between social innovation, social entrepreneurship, and social justice?”

Jessica Bolduc | October 20, 2015, 4:00-5:30 p.m.

Intersections between Social Innovation and Indigenous Knowledge

Jessica is Anishinaabe-French from Batchewana First Nation, ON and she is the National Youth Representative for the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples. She is also the Executive Director at 4Rs Youth Movement, a collaboration of 14 national organizations working with youth to create capacities for Indigenous and non-Indigenous young people to come together to cultivate understanding and action in support of a better future. In her community, Jessica works with other young leaders to foster arts-based economies, social infrastructure and hub spaces for change makers in Northern Ontario. In the future she is hoping these initiatives will be a catalyst in the development of a more sustainable place to call home by strengthening inclusion and capacity of under-appreciated communities such as youth and Indigenous nations.

See the full list of speakers